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Family Subtree Diagram : Whittet line

PLEASE NOTE: If you do not see a GRAPHIC IMAGE of a family tree here but are seeing this text instead then it is most probably because the web server is not correctly configured to serve svg pages correctly. see http://developer.mozilla.org/en/docs/SVG:Server_Configuration for information on how to correctly configure a web server for svg files. ? 1900 1901 Census of Whittet families. 13 Baffin Street; William Whittet, head, widower, 58yo, labourer in gasworks, born at Errol in Perthshire Jessie Whittet, daughter, 23yo, born Dundee 13 baffin Street; William Whittet, head, married, 30yo, iron moulder, born Dundee Jessie Whittet, wife, married, 29yo, born Dundee Jane Whittet, daughter, 2yo, born Dundee Jessie Whittet, daughter, 1yo, born Dundee William Whittet, son, 4 months old, born Dundee Note: The 58 yo William is the husband of Agnes Wilkie (deceased) The 30 yo William is his son. 1891 Census of Whittet 13 Baffin Street; William Whittet, head, widower, 48yo, gas stoker, born at Errol in Perthshire William Whittet, son, 20yo, iron moulder apprentice, born Dundee Matthew H W Whittet, son, 19, architect apprentice, born Dundee Note that daughter Jessie is not at this address. Wife Agnes died. 1800 1950 1950 Dundee 1871 census of Whittet family at 8 McGill St Dundee William Whittet, head, 28, labourer at gas works, born at Errol Agnes Whittet, wife, 34, born Coupar Angus William Whittet, son, 9mths, born Dundee 1750 1850 1650 1800 S I V E W R I G H T 1881 Census Sivewright family. Living at 80 Hawkhill, Dundee. Christina, widow, 49, school caretaker, born Inverness John, 20, unmarried, plumber, born in Dundee. Margaret, 18, unmarried, jute weaver, born Dundee. Ann, 16, unmarried, jute weaver, born Dundee. Mary, 14, unmarried, jute factory girl, born Dundee. Christina, 12, scholar, born in Dundee. Jessie, 10, scholar, born in Dundee. 1871 Census Sivewright family. Living at Doig's Entry, Dundee. John, head, 39, married, clerk, born in Montrose. Christina Young, wife, 38, married, born in Inverness. John, 11, son, born in Dundee. Margaret, 9, daughter, born in Dundee. Ann, 7, daughter, born in Dundee. Mary, 5, daughter, born in Dundee. Christina, 2, daughter, born in Dundee. Margaret Young, mother-in-law, 80, invalid, b Inverness. S I V E W R I G H T Y O U N G First 5 children born at Murroes, near Dundee. Next 2 at Airlie. Last 2 at Meigle. 1841 census Sievewright family Address is Grange, Parish of Airlie, 11km west of Forfar. James Sievewright, 45, agricultural labourer, born Angus Ann Sievewright, 33, born Angus William Sievewright, 14, born Angus George Sievewright, 12, born Angus John Sievewright, 9, born Angus Peter Sievewright, 6, born Angus David Sievewright, 2, born Angus Amelia Robertson, 22, female servant, born ouside Angus 1841 census of Young family Living at Ramsays Court, Dundee Donald Young, 55, hand loom weaver, born outside Angus Margret Young, 40, hand loom weaver, born outside Angus John Young, 10, hand loom weaver, born outside Angus Christina Young, 10, born outside Angus James Young, 5, born outside Angus (Margret's age should probably be 50 because she was 80yo at the 1871 census) Inverness 1850 W I L K I E N I C O L 1871 Census of Wilkie family living at Kelly Castle, Arbirlot. Agnes Wilkie, head of family, widow, 68, crofter's widow, born Inverarity Euphemia Wilkie, daughter, unmarried, 25, linen yarn bleacher, born Carmyllie Matthew Wilkie, son, unmarried, 23, linen yarn bleacher, born Carmyllie Jane Wilkie, grand daughter, 7, born Glasgow Alyth 1800 1850 1850 B R A I D 1850 1800 1900 2000 W H I T T E T 2000 2000 W H I T T E T W H I T T E T 1800 Kinnaird Abernyte 1800 1750 Errol V I C K E R M A N Gold Coast Australia Wairarapa New Zealand 2000 Auckland New Zealand Wellington New Zealand 2000 S H E P H E R D C R I C H T O N T H O M S O N N A L D E R W H I T T E T 1950 Dundee Dundee Refer to the Webb line for further details Glasgow Dr Martin Matthew Whittet, OBE, FRCP Edinburgh Born: 12th November 1918 Died: 10th December 2009 Specialty: Psychiatry MB Glasgow 1942, DPM London 1944, MRCP Edinburgh 1946, FRCP Edinburgh 1960, FRFPS Glasgow 1964, FRC Psych 1971 (Obituary contributed by Dr.Tadeus Baecker) Dr Whittet, retired physician superintendent of Craig Dunain Mental Hospital, Inverness ( now known as New Craigs) has died, aged 91. He took up this post in 1951, then aged 32, and retired in 1983, at the time of his appointment being the youngest physician superintendent in Scotland. At that time mental hospitals were secure and it has been reported that he not only started on a process of de-institutionalisation, opening wards, decorating and removing locks, but in some cases had the doors removed. He also started to spread psychiatric services into the community doing domiciliary visits all over the Highlands and developing links with general practitioners throughout the region. He is particularly remembered for encouraging the development of services for patients addicted to alcohol, or his sensitivity, kindness and gentle nature, and for his concern for the welfare of patients. He was quite a private person, widely perceived as a true gentle-man. I first met him in 1963 when I took up a post as his clinical equivalent on learning disability services in the Highlands. I have particularly fond memories of his support and consideration for a new-in-post younger colleague, meeting regularly to discuss practical and clinical issues occurring in the process of change in an already established service. These meetings he initiated. He is survived by his wife, four children and eight grandchildren. ------------------------------------------------------- ------------------ Dr Martin Whittet - Obituary in The Scotsman Published Date: 25 January 2010 By ALLY MUNRO Born: Glasgow. 12 November, 1918. Died: Raigmore Hospital, Inverness. 10 December, 2009, aged 91 DR MARTIN Whittet, the former Superintendent Physician at Craig Dunain Hospital, Inverness, was an outstanding physician/clinician who made an indelible mark in the field of mental health during a long and distinguished career. He was the youngest ever to run a psychiatric hospital – and then went on to revolutionise the perception of mental health illness during his 32-year reign. He was renowned for his compassion, modesty, intellect, quick wit, as much as for his achievements. An only child, he was born and raised in the west end of Glasgow. He attended Glasgow High School, where his father was head of the art department, from 1924 to 1936. On leaving school, family pressures and expectation led Whittet to embark on an engineering degree. But rebellion, coupled with family illness, led him to switch to medicine. Two days after sitting his finals, he sat the Diploma in Psychological Medicine in London having been encouraged by his mentor, the eccentric Dr Angus MacNiven, who was Physician Superintendent at Gartnavel Hospital in Glasgow. Having contracted TB as a student, Whittet was rejected for the armed services following his graduation in 1941. But he quickly found house jobs in Glasgow Royal Infirmary exhilarating, especially the burns unit where Professor Tom Gibson's researches made today's skin grafts/transplants possible and where Professor (Sir) Alexander Fleming visited to assess the early impact and efficiency of penicillin. Whittet worked initially as a clinical clerk/consultant at Gartnavel and then deputy physician superintendent under Dr MacNiven. In 1951, at the age of 32, he was appointed Physician Superintendent and Consultant Psychiatrist at Craig Dunain Hospital, Inverness, the youngest ever appointee to such a position in the country. His remit was to develop a proactive mental health system covering the whole of the Highlands and Islands. He strongly believed and practiced the principle that doctors had a duty to be kind and humble. Those who worked for him considered him warm and caring but also as someone who brought fun to the workplace. He inherited a secure asylum where virtually all patients were certified. But he tirelessly worked to transform it into an open hospital where a significant percentage of patients would enter voluntarily. It was reputed that prior to his arrival admissions were averaging around five a year. However, following his changes, it was not unknown for admissions to be five a day. Patients were happy to go there and such was his impact that, once there, many did not want to leave. He insisted on visiting every patient in the hospital daily and if he could not do this, he would have one of his senior consultants do so and have them report back to him before the day was over. His concern for his patients' well-being extended to ensuring an appetising diet and a change of décor from ubiquitous hospital brown. He encouraged occupational therapy – the hospital had its own gardens, farm, joiners, electricians, plumbers, painters and leisure activities. He introduced a shop and canteen for the patients and a bowling green in later years. He set up regional clinics throughout the Highlands and Islands and to aid communication with those from the Western Highlands and Islands, learnt Gaelic and became a keen member of the Gaelic Society. He was always prepared to personally attend no matter how remote the area or inclement the weather and on one occasion had to commandeer a boat to reach a patient who had taken to the water. His office, with its open fire and comfortable armchairs, was a far cry from clinical environments of today and many a relative was reassured over a comforting cup of tea by the fireside. In an effort to combat the high level of alcoholism in the Highlands and Islands, branches of Alcoholics Anonymous were set up at his instigation. Over the early years in Inverness, he became increasingly active in the forensic field and was frequently called upon to act as an expert witness for many high-profile criminal cases, including murder trials. Albeit very serious affairs, he managed to demonstrate a lighter side on one such occasion when he was asked if the accused might have "a bee in his bonnet rather than a delusion"? Dr Martin replied: "Sir, I must respectfully say in all seriousness … if it's a bee, then it's an abnormal bee!" In another case, Ian Simpson, the "A9 murderer" who was subsequently incarcerated in the high security Carstairs Mental Hospital, later showed his appreciation of Whittet's testimony by sending him a gift of a violin he had carved and a painting of the murder scene. As well as being psychiatric commissioner to HM Armed Forces, Whittet also spent many years as psychiatric consultant to HM Prisons and, specifically, Porterfield Prison in Inverness. Despite this onerous workload he found time, not only for the Gaelic lessons, but also public speaking at forums of all levels in his quest to challenge the stigma surrounding mental illness. In the little free time he had, Whittet was also a keen writer and as well as clinical papers wrote many booklets on a variety of topics – Over the Hills and Not So Far Away, A Liquid Measure of Highland History and Forgotten People-Single Homeless, to mention but a few. His outside interests included salmon fishing, golfing and playing the accordion. On retiring from Craig Dunain Hospital in 1983, he was appointed the Lord Chancellor's Medical Visitor from 1985-88 and travelled the length and breadth of Scotland ensuring that the interests of those with mental problems were appropriately upheld. Last Updated: 24 January 2010 10:10 PM Source: The Scotsman Location: Edinburgh Related Topics: Obituaries ------------------------------------------------------- - Dr Martin M Whittet; Physician and psychiatrist Published on 21 Jan 2010 Dr Martin M Whittet, who has died aged 91, was a leading clinician, physician and psychiatrist, who for more than 30 years ran Craig Dunain in Inverness, the only psychiatric hospital in the Highlands. Born in Jordanhill, Glasgow, he was a man who became renowned for his compassion, modesty, intellect and wit, as much as for his achievements. He was born and raised in the west end of the city and attended Glasgow High School, where his father was head of the art department. Upon leaving school, family pressures and expectation saw him embark on an engineering degree but useful rebellion coupled with family illness led to a change to medicine. Two days after sitting his finals, he sat the Diploma in Psychological Medicine in London, having been encouraged by his mentor, Dr Angus MacNiven, who was physician superintendent at Glasgow’s Gartnavel Hospital. He professed to have been struggling, when he was asked if it was true that Dr MacNiven rode round Gartnavel hospital grounds on horseback wearing a bowler hat with an umbrella up and reading papers. When he replied in the affirmative, the examiner stated: “That young man knows enough about clinical psychology. Dr MacNiven’s point of view being that if you had a horse to exercise, papers to read and it was raining, then what else was there to do?” He graduated in 1941 after a bout of TB which meant he was unfit to serve in the armed forces. But he found house jobs in Glasgow Royal Infirmary exhilarating, especially the burns unit where Professor Tom Gibson’s research made today’s skin grafts and transplants possible and where Professor (Sir) Alexander Fleming visited to assess the impact and efficiency of penicillin. Following from this, he worked initially as a clinical clerk/consultant at Gartnavel and then deputy physician superintendent. In 1951, he was appointed physician superintendent and consultant psychiatrist at Craig Dunain, the youngest appointee to such a position in the country. As well as having total responsibility for the hospital (medical/clinical side) and its operation, his remit was to develop a pro-active mental health system covering the Highlands and Islands. He believed strongly and practised the principle that doctors had a duty to be kind and humble and further promoted the adage that, in life, two things stand like stone: kindness in another’s trouble and courage in your own. Dr Whittett tirelessly set about revolutionising public perception of mental illness throughout not just the Highlands and Islands, but the whole country. Dr Whittet inherited a secure asylum where virtually all patients were certified but, through time and the development of a much more proactive mental health programme, transformed it into an open hospital where a significant percentage of patients would enter voluntarily. It was reputed that prior to his arrival admissions were averaging around five per year but, following his changes, it was not unknown for admissions to be that many each day. He insisted on visiting every patient on a daily basis and if, for any reason, he could not do this, he would have one of his senior consultants do so and have them report back to him. He set up regional clinics throughout the Highlands and Islands and to aid communication with those from the Western Highlands and Islands, learned Gaelic and became a keen member of the Gaelic Society. He had a deep and abiding affection for the Hebridean people and took great comfort from hearing the Stornowegian accent of a nurse who tended him during his final days. In an effort to combat the high level of alcoholism in the Highlands and Islands, branches of Alcoholics Anonymous were set up at Dr Whittet’s instigation and his dedication to the cause kept him involved long after his retirement. He also spent several years undertaking research into alcoholism and depression. During the early years in Inverness, he became increasingly active in the forensic field and was frequently called upon to act as an expert witness for many high profile criminal cases. Ian Simpson, better known as the A9 murderer and subsequently incarcerated in Carstairs, later showed his appreciation of Dr Whittet’s testimony by sending him a gift of a violin he had carved, together with a painting he had done of the actual murder scene. As well as being psychiatric commissioner to the armed forces, he was also appointed and spent many years as psychiatric consultant to the prison service and specifically, Porterfield Prison in Inverness. There were also numerous occasions on which he was invited by the Lord Chancellor’s office to review and critique proposed new legislation where there might be any medical relevance. In the little free time he had, he was also a keen writer and, as well as clinical papers, wrote many booklets on a variety of topics, Over the Hills and Not So Far Away, A Liquid Measure of Highland History and Forgotten People – Single Homeless to mention but a few. His outside interests included salmon fishing, golfing and playing the accordion. Accomplished in the first two, his efforts on accordion were less successful and he and his accordion were banished to his office at the hospital after his wife banned him from practising in the house. On retiring from Craig Dunain Hospital in 1983, he was appointed the Lord Chancellor’s medical visitor from 1985-88 and travelled the length and breadth of Scotland ensuring that the interests of those with mental problems were appropriately upheld. Martin Whittet is survived by his wife of 62 years, Nina, daughter Jean, sons Martin, David and Gordon, and eight grandchildren. Physician and psychiatrist; Born November 12, 1918; Died December 10, 2009. Kapiti Coast New Zealand Dundee Scotland Dundee Scotland West Coast Australia 2010 2010 2010 2010 2020 D O N A L D Parent Biological Child Parent Biological Child Biological Child Biological Child Biological Child Biological Child Biological Child Biological Child Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Biological Child Biological Child Biological Child Biological Child Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Biological Child Biological Child Biological Child Biological Child Biological Child Biological Child Biological Child Biological Child Biological Child Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Biological Child Parent Parent Parent Biological Child Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Biological Child Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Biological Child Biological Child Biological Child Biological Child Biological Child Biological Child Biological Child Biological Child Biological Child Biological Child Biological Child Parent Parent Parent Parent Biological Child Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Biological Child Biological Child Biological Child Parent Parent Parent Parent Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Parent Parent Biological Child Biological Child Biological Child Biological Child Biological Child Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Biological Child Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Parent Parent Parent Parent Biological Child Biological Child Biological Child Biological Child Biological Child Biological Child Parent Parent Parent Parent Parent Biological Child Biological Child Biological Child Biological Child Parent Parent Parent Parent Parent Parent Biological Child Biological Child Parent Biological Child Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Biological Child Biological Child Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Biological Child Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Biological Child Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Biological Child Biological Child Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Biological Child Biological Child Parent Parent Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Biological Child Biological Child Biological Child Biological Child Parent Parent Parent Parent Biological Child Marriage (seven children) 30 Dec 1896 Dundee (three children) W26 2 July 1869 A32 Arbirlot (six children) 4 July 1860 Dundee (three children) 26 Oct 1827 Inverness (ten children) 3 Feb 1826 Dundee (a child) (six children) 23 Sept 1824 Bendochy 18 Sept 1824 Inverarity (a child) (five children) 1 Nov 1872 Arbroath (six children) 17 Feb 1789 Alyth Marriage (three children) 2 November 1974 Papatoetoe, Auckland Marriage (two children) 1974 Marriage (two children) (five children) 25th March 1950, Wallacetown Presbyterian Church, Dundee. (a child) (a child) 5Aug 1804 Kettins (six children) 22 Feb 1788 Abernyte (three children) 23-6-1773 Dundee (five children) 16 Dec 1843 Errol 23 Dec 1861 Dundee S38 6th Jan 1882 W38 (a child) (two children) 17 July 1988 (two children) 27 Feb 2003 (a child) (a child) (four children) 1974 (two children) (a child) (three children) 10 Nov 2007 (three children) 1977 Kennoway, Fife (two children) 1965 Dundee (two children) 27 June 2001 Gibraltar (two children) (a child) (a child) M45 27 July 1917 J40 (a child) 8 March 2010 Auckland (a child) (three children) (a child) (a child) (a child) (two children) (two children) 1944 Dundee (a child) (a child) (a child) 1927 - 2004 William Whittet (computer analyst, b.Baffin St Dundee) 76 76 Photo:  Bill & Isobel's 40th wedding anniversary, March 1990 in Masterton, New Zealand.
Back row from left:  Paul, James, Lorna, Amanda Vickerman;  Iain, Susan, Andrew Whittet; Kirsty Vickerman; Roderick, Anita, Graeme Whittet.
Front row from left:  Gordon, Joanne, Jodie with Kesley, David, Bill, Isobel, Maia Whittet; Aimee Vickerman, Cherry Whittet.

1927 - 2004 Isabella (Isobel) Mitchell Webb (b.Dundee) 76 76 Photo:  Bill & Isobel's 40th wedding anniversary, March 1990 in Masterton, New Zealand.
Back row from left:  Paul, James, Lorna, Amanda Vickerman;  Iain, Susan, Andrew Whittet; Kirsty Vickerman; Roderick, Anita, Graeme Whittet.
Front row from left:  Gordon, Joanne, Jodie with Kesley, David, Bill, Isobel, Maia Whittet; Aimee Vickerman, Cherry Whittet.
1906 - 1930 George McIntosh Whittet (ship caulker) 24 24 Ship caulker at a Dundee shipyard.
Died from pneumonia caused by working in a poorly-ventilated work area.

1911 - 1958 Helen Wilkie Whittet (cashier) 47 47 33yo at marriage on 23rd Oct 1944.  >born 1910 or 1911 D. 1977 Elizabeth (Bessie) Whittet Youngest?
Lived at 34 Albert St at time of marriage?
Elizabeth A W Whittet on marriage record.
1870 - 1928 William Whittet (iron moulder, b.Dundee) 58 58 1926 address: 15 baffin Street from George & Georgina marriage cert. 1837 - 1879 Agnes Wilkie (domestic servant, Arbirlot, b.Coupar Angus) 42 42 32 yo domestic servant from the Parish of Arbirlot at time of marriage in 1869.
>born 1836-7
Died December 9th 1879, 42 years old. > born 1836-7
Matthew H Wilkie was a witness on Agnes' marriage certificate.
1871 Census:- 34yo born in Coupar Angus
1871 - 1941 Matthew Henry Wilkie Whittet (school teacher, b.Dundee) 69 69 1900 William Whittet (b.Dundee) Info from Helen Ewen(Fraser):-  "Uncle Bill from the USA is the person on the right."     Will's sister Bessie is next to him, then Bessie's husband John and friend Jean.
1898 - 1937 Jane Farquharson Whittet (b.Baffin St Dundee) 39 39 Born 27 June 1898 at 13 Baffin Street Dundee.
Died 29 Sept 1937    6 1/2 months miscarriage.
photo 4 Whittet sisters closeup  Bessie, Jessie, Helen - Jane in front c1930
1899 - 1947 Jessie Whittet (b.Baffin St Dundee) 48 48 photo 4 Whittet sisters closeup  Bessie, Jessie, Helen - Jane in front c1930 1877 - 1950 Jessie Whittet (b.Dundee) 72 72 23 yo living with her widowed father at 13 Baffin Street.
Her older brother William and his family lived in another house at 13 Baffin Street.
1871 - 1929 Jessie Wilson Sivewright (domestic servant, b.Dundee) 58 58 Jessie Wilson Sivewright (centre) with daughter Bessie and unknown.
At the burial of her husband William.
1881 census:  Jessie is 10 years old living at 80 Hawkhill Dundee, with her widowed mother and 5 siblings.  Her mother is a school caretaker.  Brother John is a plumber. Sisters Maggie and Ann are jute weavers. Sister Mary is a jute factory girl. Jessie and Christina are at school.
1832 John Sievewright (clerk, b.Murroes Monikie) Occupation = clerk
28yo at time of marriage
Born in Parish of Murroes, near Monikie.
1831 Christina Mackenzie Young (b.Inverness) Still alive in 1896 at marriage of daughter Jessie and William.
1896 address was 1 Blackheath Place, Dundee.
28yo at marriage on 4th July 1860 >born 1831 or 1832
38yo at 1871 census >born 1832 or 1833.
1862 Maggie Sivewright 9yo at 1871 census > born 1861 or 1862
Details from William and Jessie marriage certificate.
1860 John Sivewright 11yo at 1871 census > born 1859 or 1860 1864 Ann Sivewright 7yo at 1871 census > born 1863 or 1864 1866 Mary Sivewright 5yo at 1871 census > born 1865 or 1866 1869 Christina Sivewright 2yo at 1871 census > born 1868 or 1869 1786 Donald Young (weaver) Weaver, deceased, at time of daughter Christina's marriage in 1860.
55yo at 1841 census
born 1785 or 1786
1791 Margret McKenzie (weaver, b.Inverness) born in Inverness (ref 1871 census)
80yo at 1871 census > born 1790 or 1791
1796 James Sievewright (land steward) Land steward, deceased, at time of son John's marriage in 1860.
45yo agricultural labourer at Airlie at 1841 census.
born 1795 or 1796 in Angus
1809 - 1857 Ann Braid (b.Liberton, Edinburgh) 47 47 born 1809 in Liberton, SSE of Edinburgh.
http://www.genuki.org.uk/big/sct/MLN/Liberton/
1836 James Young from Christina's marriage cert
5yo at 1841 census > born 1835 or 1836
1844 Agnes Duff Sievewright 1828 George Sievewright 1830 James Sievewright Not on the 1841 census.  Maybe died as a child. 1842 Margaret Scott Sievewright 1834 Peter Murray Sievewright 1826 William Braid Sievewright 1838 David Sievewright 1836 Janet Wilson Sievewright Not on the 1841 census.  Maybe died as a child. 1841 Thomas Falconer Sievewright William Braid from Ann's death certificate. 1829 John McKenzie Young 1802 - 1864 George Wilkie (linen yarn bleacher, crofter, b.Alyth) 62 62 linen yarn bleacher. 1802 - 1881 Agnes Nicol (b. Inverarity) 78 78 68yo crofter's widow at Arbirlot at 1871 census  >born 1802 or 1803
78 at time of death on 5 Feb 1881 >born 1802 or 1803
1827 James Wilkie (b.Alyth) 1829 John Wilkie (b. Bendochy) James Nicol (blacksmith) blacksmith
from daughter Agnes's death cert
Helen Peter from daughter Agnes's death cert 1874 Agnes Nicol Wilkie 1845 - 1920 Matthew Wilkie (linen yarn bleacher, stationer, b. Carmyllie) 74 74 25yo bleach field worker at time of marriage
23yo linen yarn bleacher at Arbirlot at 1871 census
Matthew H Wilkie was a witness on sister Agnes' marriage certificate.
Alexia Carrie 1839 Ann Wilkie (b. Carmyllie) 1846 Euphemia Wilkie (linen yarn bleacher, b. Carmyllie) 25 yo linen yarn bleacher in Arbirlot at 1871 census
born 1845 or 1846
George Wilkie (cattle dealer) Isabel Peter Called Isabella on her son's death certificate.
ISABL on her marriage details
1796 Barbara Wilkie (b.Alyth) 1792 Isabel Wilkie (b.Alyth) 1794 James Wilkie (b.Alyth) 1799 John Wilkie (b.Alyth) 1790 Margaret Wilkie (b.Alyth) 1876 - 1954 Margaret Carrie Wilkie 78 78 1881 - 1956 Jane Wilkie 75 75 1878 - 1958 Helen Panton Wilkie 80 80 Nellie Wilkie 1951 Iain Webb Whittet (electrical engineer, b.Dundee) 66 66 1955 Susan Joan Bell 62 62 1953 Roderick William Whittet (b.Dundee) 64 64 1957 Cherry Howard 60 60 Mother: Elsie Howard
Father: R Howard
1975 Anita Maree Whittet 42 42 1981 Maia Jasmine Whittet 36 36 MAIA WHITTET – LIGHTING OPERATOR
Maia is a graduate of Toi Whakaari: NZ Drama School. During her time at there she designed sound for The Rover (2002 Graduation production) and the lights for Mother Courage, Road and the New Zealand School of Dance Choreographic Season. Maia has worked with the Australian Ballet in Melbourne and most recently designed the lights for Sniper. Forthcoming projects include the lighting design for Briar Grace Smith’s play When Sun and Moon Collide.  
Wellington production of "The Conch presents Vula" October 2003.
David Nalder 126 Hataitai Rd, Wellington   (2003) 2000 Lucy Nalder 18 18 2003 Megan Nalder 14 14 George Whittet (road labourer, died before 1859) 1775 George Whittet (b.Kinnaird) (! died before 1841 census) Alexander Whittet George Whittet Eliz Burt (Dysart, Fife) The marriage of George and Elizabeth is also recorded on 4th August 1804 in the Parish of Dysart, Fife. 1796 Jo Whittet (Abernyte) Francis Whittet Katherine Small 1799 Margaret Whittet (Abernyte) 1794 Peter Whittet (Abernyte) 1793 William Whittet (Abernyte) 1791 James Whittet (Abernyte) 1789 George Whittet (Abernyte) (! died before 1841 census) Can't find any similar name and similar age on the 1841census so he may have died before 6th June 1841. John Whittet Margaret Hill 1774 Catherine Whittet (Dundee) 1788 Charles Whittet (Dundee) 1790 George Whittet (b. Dundee) 1844 - 1915 William Whittet (gas work stoker, b.Errol) 71 71 17 yo ploughman living at the Farm Road Bothy, Abernyte, at 1861 census.
26 yo Fireman at gas works at time of marriage to Agnes in 1869.
1896 address: 13 Baffin Street, Dundee



1821 - 1859 Alexander Whittet (farm servant b.Kinnaird) (buried Kinnaird churchyard) 38 38 1851 census details;
32 yo farm servant living with wife Betsy(25yo) and son William(7yo) at Glen Bran, Longforgan.
Alexander born at Kinnaird. Betsy and  William born at Errol.

Death Cert details;
Farm servant, married, aged 38, died from fever on 13th April 1859 at Newton, Auchterhouse. Father was George Whittet, road labourer, deceased. Mother's name unknown.  Son William was present.
1826 - 1877 Betsy Kemp (b.Errol) 50 50 See son William's marriage & death certs

1861 census.  Betsy, Alexander and James living at Andersons Land (off Princes Street) with boarder Richard Gibbs (19 yo).
Betsy 35 yo. Alexander 7 yo. James 5 yo
1835 Alexander Gibb 26yo at marriage in 1861 > born 1834 or 1835 1843 - 1883 Sarah Morton 40 40 Died 14 months after her marriage to William.
Born about 1843
James Short 1853 Alexander Whittet (b.Abernyte) 1861 census.  Betsy, Alexander and James living at Andersons Land (off Princes Street) with boarder Richard Gibbs (19 yo).
Betsy 35 yo. Alexander 7 yo. James 5 yo.
1855 James Kemp Kerr Whittet (b. Lochton, Abernyte) Email from Fraser Brown, November 2007:
Whittets Related To Us

I had quite a good look at Scotlandspeople and the LDS site to see if I
could find any possible way of linking our families. I did notice the
following birth which seems to belong to your branch. (Scotlandspeople)

WHITTET - James Kemp Kerr- male- born July 2nd  Lochton, Longforgan.
Father- Alexander WHITTET  age 36ys - farm servant-Craigdaller, Parish of
Kinnaird
When married-Dec 22nd 1843 at Charlestown Parish of Errol
3 boys living-2 girls deceased
Mother-Elizabeth WHITTET - maiden name KEMP  age 30yrs
Her 5th child

Registered July 5th 1856 Longforgan

I noticed that his maternal grandmother was an Elspet KEIR ( I suppose one is a misspelling)
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1861 census.  Betsy, Alexander and James living at Andersons Land (off Princes Street) with boarder Richard Gibbs (19 yo).
Betsy 35 yo. Alexander 7 yo. James 5 yo
Email from Fraser Brown, November 2007:
Whittets Related To Us

I had quite a good look at Scotlandspeople and the LDS site to see if I
could find any possible way of linking our families. I did notice the
following birth which seems to belong to your branch. (Scotlandspeople)

WHITTET - James Kemp Kerr- male- born July 2nd  Lochton, Longforgan.
Father- Alexander WHITTET  age 36ys - farm servant-Craigdaller, Parish of
Kinnaird
When married-Dec 22nd 1843 at Charlestown Parish of Errol
3 boys living-2 girls deceased
Mother-Elizabeth WHITTET - maiden name KEMP  age 30yrs
Her 5th child

Registered July 5th 1856 Longforgan

I noticed that his maternal grandmother was an Elspet KEIR ( I suppose one is a misspelling)
--------------------------------------------------------------
Email from Fraser Brown, November 2007:
Whittets Related To Us

I had quite a good look at Scotlandspeople and the LDS site to see if I
could find any possible way of linking our families. I did notice the
following birth which seems to belong to your branch. (Scotlandspeople)

WHITTET - James Kemp Kerr- male- born July 2nd  Lochton, Longforgan.
Father- Alexander WHITTET  age 36ys - farm servant-Craigdaller, Parish of
Kinnaird
When married-Dec 22nd 1843 at Charlestown Parish of Errol
3 boys living-2 girls deceased
Mother-Elizabeth WHITTET - maiden name KEMP  age 30yrs
Her 5th child

Registered July 5th 1856 Longforgan

I noticed that his maternal grandmother was an Elspet KEIR ( I suppose one is a misspelling)
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1902 Matthew (Matt) Whittet Matthew Whittet with older brother Bill.
Matt received a head injury in the war, had a head plate.
Went to USA on the same boat at his brother Bill.
1907 - 1998 Georgina Gavine (jute weaver) 91 91 26 Victoria Rd, Dundee prior to marriage.
Jute weaver.

The Glasgow Herald - 6th November 1951.
Sisters Gassed.  Mrs Georgina Whittet, 16 Baffin Street, Dundee, and her sister, Miss Helen Gavine, were found yesterday overcome by gas when Mrs Whittet's son arrived home from school. Their condition was stated last night to be improving. It is understood that a gas tap had been partially opened by accident.
Gillard American 1959 - 2009 Graeme George Whittet (b.Dundee) 49 49 1959 Gordon John Whittet (b.Dundee) 58 58 1966 Jodie McAuley 51 51 Lynne 1989 Belinda Whittet 28 28 1990 Janine Whittet 27 27 1989 Kesley Whittet 29 29 1991 Shannon Whittet 26 26 Jackie 2009 Bradley Graeme Henderson Whittet 8 8 Michael Shearer 1994 Damian 24 24 1957 Lorna Anne Whittet (b.Dundee) 61 61 1952 Paul Vickerman 66 66 Parents:  Jim and Edna 1975 Amanda Louise Vickerman 43 43 1977 Kirsty Ann Vickerman 40 40 1984 Aimee Isabel Vickerman 33 33 1986 James Michael Vickerman 31 31 Kayne Thomson 2006 Cameron Paul William Thomson 11 11 Andrea 2007 Mason James Vickerman 10 10 2008 Sam Thomson 9 9 1982 Joanne Louise Whittet 35 35 1984 David Samuel Whittet 33 33 1979 Andrew 38 38 1982 Jessie Leigh Auton 35 35 1944 - 2003 Frederick Gillard Whittet 59 59 Anne McDonald McEneany 1982 Sean Frederick Whittet 36 36 1984 Laura Whittet 34 34 1947 Lavinia (Linda) Eileen Lee 70 70 1979 Marie Whittet 39 39 1965 William (Billy) Andrew Whittet --- changed surname to Shepherd 53 53 1966 Lynn Jacqueline Whittet 51 51 1961 Colin Crichton 56 56 1999 Aaron Christopher Crichton 18 18 2002 Beth Mary Crichton 15 15 D. 2016 Veronica 2002 Leah Jaclin Shepherd 16 16 2004 Hannah Lynn Shepherd 14 14 Jane Martin 1918 - 2009 Dr Martin Matthew Whittet, OBE, FRCP Edin 91 91 Dr Martin Matthew Whittet, OBE, FRCP Edinburgh
Born: 12th November 1918
Died: 10th December 2009
Specialty: Psychiatry
MB Glasgow 1942,
DPM London 1944,
MRCP Edinburgh 1946,
FRCP Edinburgh 1960,
FRFPS Glasgow 1964,
FRC Psych 1971
(Obituary contributed by Dr.Tadeus Baecker)
Dr Whittet, retired physician superintendent of Craig Dunain Mental Hospital, Inverness ( now known as New Craigs) has died, aged 91.
He took up this post in 1951, then aged 32, and retired in 1983, at the time of his appointment being the youngest physician superintendent in Scotland. At that time mental hospitals were secure and it has been reported that he not only started on a process of de-institutionalisation, opening wards, decorating and removing locks, but in some cases had the doors removed.
He also started to spread psychiatric services into the community doing domiciliary visits all over the Highlands and developing links with general practitioners throughout the region.
He is particularly remembered for encouraging the development of services for patients addicted to alcohol, or his sensitivity, kindness and gentle nature, and for his concern for the welfare of patients. He was quite a private person, widely perceived as a true gentle-man.
I first met him in 1963 when I took up a post as his clinical equivalent on learning disability services in the Highlands. I have particularly fond memories of his support and consideration for a new-in-post younger colleague, meeting regularly to discuss practical and clinical issues occurring in the process of change in an already established service. These meetings he initiated.
He is survived by his wife, four children and eight grandchildren.
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Dr Martin Whittet   -   Obituary in The Scotsman
Published Date: 25 January 2010
By ALLY MUNRO
Born: Glasgow. 12 November, 1918. Died: Raigmore Hospital, Inverness. 10 December, 2009, aged 91

DR MARTIN Whittet, the former Superintendent Physician at Craig Dunain Hospital, Inverness, was an outstanding physician/clinician who made an indelible mark in the field of mental health during a long and distinguished career.

He was the youngest ever to run a psychiatric hospital – and then went on to revolutionise the perception of mental health illness during his 32-year reign. He was renowned for his compassion, modesty, intellect, quick wit, as much as for his achievements.

An only child, he was born and raised in the west end of Glasgow. He attended Glasgow High School, where his father was head of the art department, from 1924 to 1936.

On leaving school, family pressures and expectation led Whittet to embark on an engineering degree. But rebellion, coupled with family illness, led him to switch to medicine.

Two days after sitting his finals, he sat the Diploma in Psychological Medicine in London having been encouraged by his mentor, the eccentric Dr Angus MacNiven, who was Physician Superintendent at Gartnavel Hospital in Glasgow.

Having contracted TB as a student, Whittet was rejected for the armed services following his graduation in 1941. But he quickly found house jobs in Glasgow Royal Infirmary exhilarating, especially the burns unit where Professor Tom Gibson's researches made today's skin grafts/transplants possible and where Professor (Sir) Alexander Fleming visited to assess the early impact and efficiency of penicillin.

Whittet worked initially as a clinical clerk/consultant at Gartnavel and then deputy physician superintendent under Dr MacNiven.

In 1951, at the age of 32, he was appointed Physician Superintendent and Consultant Psychiatrist at Craig Dunain Hospital, Inverness, the youngest ever appointee to such a position in the country.

His remit was to develop a proactive mental health system covering the whole of the Highlands and Islands. He strongly believed and practiced the principle that doctors had a duty to be kind and humble.

Those who worked for him considered him warm and caring but also as someone who brought fun to the workplace.

He inherited a secure asylum where virtually all patients were certified. But he tirelessly worked to transform it into an open hospital where a significant percentage of patients would enter voluntarily. It was reputed that prior to his arrival admissions were averaging around five a year. However, following his changes, it was not unknown for admissions to be five a day. Patients were happy to go there and such was his impact that, once there, many did not want to leave.

He insisted on visiting every patient in the hospital daily and if he could not do this, he would have one of his senior consultants do so and have them report back to him before the day was over.

His concern for his patients' well-being extended to ensuring an appetising diet and a change of décor from ubiquitous hospital brown. He encouraged occupational therapy – the hospital had its own gardens, farm, joiners, electricians, plumbers, painters and leisure activities. He introduced a shop and canteen for the patients and a bowling green in later years.

He set up regional clinics throughout the Highlands and Islands and to aid communication with those from the Western Highlands and Islands, learnt Gaelic and became a keen member of the Gaelic Society.

He was always prepared to personally attend no matter how remote the area or inclement the weather and on one occasion had to commandeer a boat to reach a patient who had taken to the water.

His office, with its open fire and comfortable armchairs, was a far cry from clinical environments of today and many a relative was reassured over a comforting cup of tea by the fireside.

In an effort to combat the high level of alcoholism in the Highlands and Islands, branches of Alcoholics Anonymous were set up at his instigation.

Over the early years in Inverness, he became increasingly active in the forensic field and was frequently called upon to act as an expert witness for many high-profile criminal cases, including murder trials.

Albeit very serious affairs, he managed to demonstrate a lighter side on one such occasion when he was asked if the accused might have "a bee in his bonnet rather than a delusion"?

Dr Martin replied: "Sir, I must respectfully say in all seriousness … if it's a bee, then it's an abnormal bee!"

In another case, Ian Simpson, the "A9 murderer" who was subsequently incarcerated in the high security Carstairs Mental Hospital, later showed his appreciation of Whittet's testimony by sending him a gift of a violin he had carved and a painting of the murder scene.

As well as being psychiatric commissioner to HM Armed Forces, Whittet also spent many years as psychiatric consultant to HM Prisons and, specifically, Porterfield Prison in Inverness. Despite this onerous workload he found time, not only for the Gaelic lessons, but also public speaking at forums of all levels in his quest to challenge the stigma surrounding mental illness.

In the little free time he had, Whittet was also a keen writer and as well as clinical papers wrote many booklets on a variety of topics – Over the Hills and Not So Far Away, A Liquid Measure of Highland History and Forgotten People-Single Homeless, to mention but a few. His outside interests included salmon fishing, golfing and playing the accordion.

On retiring from Craig Dunain Hospital in 1983, he was appointed the Lord Chancellor's Medical Visitor from 1985-88 and travelled the length and breadth of Scotland ensuring that the interests of those with mental problems were appropriately upheld.


Last Updated: 24 January 2010 10:10 PM
Source: The Scotsman
Location: Edinburgh
Related Topics: Obituaries
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